PetMed Animal Health Center

1170 Iowa Street
Dubuque, IA 52001

(563)583-8387

dbqpetmed.com

Surgery

Common Procedure For Most Surgeries

Please note that some surgeries are bigger than others or there may be differences when it comes to the type of animal (dogs/cats vs. exotics) and may require certain guidelines to follow or must be performed on a certain day. We are able to perform regular surgeries every week on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. We ask the food and water be pulled the night before, no later than midnight. Drop off is between 7:30am and 8:00am the morning of the surgery. When dropping off, you will have a form that needs to be gone over in regards to the surgery. You will be given the options of microchipping, heartworm testing, nail dremmeling, and the Pre-Anesthetic Safety Package while your pet is here.

Pre-Anesthetic Safety Package (Dogs & Cats): This package includes a chemistry, CBC, & IV fluids throughout the procedure. Because most anesthetics are removed from the body by the liver & kidneys, it is very important to know if these organs are functioning properly before undergoing anesthesia. In doing the bloodwork beforehand, we are able to identify if your pet is well enough to go under anesthesia or if we need to select a safer anesthesia to use. We also recommend the use of intravenous fluids during any/all surgical procedures. This fluid therapy is designed to maintain blood pressure, replace blood loss, ease the administration of life saving drugs if need be, and has been proven to decrease recovery time. Although optional, the Pre-Anesthetic Safety Package is highly recommended because after all, it is always better to be safe than sorry!

Spaying

Why it should be done: When your pet has reached at least 4-6 months of age, spaying can be done. Spaying your pet can have many benefits such as preventing an unwanted pregnancy. In cases where your dog needs a c-section, the procedure can be quite costly, especially in an emergency situation! More importantly, when done prior to the first heat cycle, it can decrease the risk of mammary cancer to virtually 0%. It also prevents pyometra, a life-threatening infection of the uterus that often occurs in older female dogs.

Procedure: Spaying is generally a same day surgery. Once dropped off in the morning, we will begin the Pre-Anesthetic Safety Package. Once your pet's bloodwork is complete and looks sufficient, your pet will undergo anesthesia for the procedure and be set up with IV fluids. Spaying involves removing the uterus and ovaries. Once complete, your pet will be closely monitored post surgery while coming out of anesthesia. Your pet is generally able to go home in the afternoon. You will be sent home with a set of care instructions as well as medication. Suture removal will be needed 10 days after the surgery. During the 10 days, an e-collar is needed to ensure your pet will not be able to bother the incision to allow proper healing. 

Neutering

Why it should be done: When your pet has reached 4-6 months of age, neutering can be done. Neutering your pet can have many benefits such as preventing unwanted breeding. If done prior to sexual maturity (usually 6 months), it significantly reduces the risk of interdog aggression, roaming, urine marking and mounting behaviors. It also greatly reduces the risk of prostate cancer and prostatitis as well as perianal tumors.

Procedure: Neutering is generally a same day surgery. Once dropped off in the morning, we will begin the Pre-Anesthetic Safety Package. Once your pet's bloodwork is complete and looks sufficient, your pet will undergo anesthesia for the procedure and be set up with IV fluids. Neutering involves removing the testicles and spermatic cords. Once complete, your pet will be closely monitored post surgery while coming out of anesthesia. Your pet is generally able to go home in the afternoon. You will be sent home with a set of care instructions as well as medication. Suture removal will be needed 10 days after the surgery. During the 10 days, an e-collar is needed to ensure your pet will not be able to bother the incision to allow proper healing.

Non-Invasive Gastrointestinal Pexi with Scope

Gastric Dilatation Volvulus, or GDV, is a serious, life threatening condition in which the dog's stomach first bloats to a massive size and then twists around itself in the abdomen. This causes a number of very serious issues. As the stomach twists it pinches off the esophagus, preventing the dog from vomiting or belching up the excess gases building up in its stomach. Not only can this result in the stomach rupturing, but as the pressure in the abdomen becomes higher and higher it makes it impossible for the dog to take a normal breath and crushes the major veins and arteries leading to circulatory collapse and death.

GDV is most often seen in large and giant breed dogs, such as Standard Poodles, Great Danes, Saint Bernards, Mastiffs, German Shepherds, Setters, and other deep-chested breeds. Dogs over the age of 7 years are most at risk. Treatment must be immediate and aggressive, involving emergency surgery. Even with treatment as many as 33% may still be lost.

A Gastropexy is a surgical procedure done to prevent the "Volvulus", or twisting component of a GDV. This surgery involves attaching the pyloric region of the stomach to the body wall to prevent it from moving in the event that the dogs stomach were to bloat (dilate). Traditionally, this has meant making a very large belly incision that allowed enough room for the surgeons hands to work. Here at PetMed, we have the ability to perform an Endoscope Guided Gastropexy. The use of our scope allows us to fill the stomach with air and access it from a very small (4-5cm) incision made on the dogs right side. This allows us superior visualization and access to the dogs stomach as well as giving us a much better placement of the gastropexy.

Cranial Cruciate Ligament Repair

The cranial cruciate ligament, or CCL, is an important structure in the stifle, or knee joint, of the dog. The equivalent to the ACL or anterior cruciate ligament which many people have heard of athletes injuring, is probably also one of the most common orthopedic injuries that dogs experience. It occurs most often in large breed dogs such as Labrador Retreivers, Golden Retrievers, and PitBull Terriers. What we often hear from owners is that the dog was running in the yard and then suddenly start limping. 

In order to diagnose a cruciate ligament injury, our veterinarians will do an exam and most likely take radiographs of the affected leg. Treatment involves surgery. There are several techniques to repair a CCL rupture. Our veterinarians perform a procedure that involves placing a suture line in the knee that imitates what the CCL in the sense of acting like an internal splint while the knee heals. This is also a very affordable procedure!

In addition to those listed above, we are also able to perform several other types of surgeries such as:

Gastrointestinal Surgeries - foreign body removals, biopsies, and mass removals.

Eye Surgeries - corneal ulcer repairs, mass removals, and repair of eyelid defects such as entropian and ectropian conditions.

Fracture Repairs